How To Relate Depth And Complexity Icons In An Essay

Dispute 31.01.2020

Always introduce a prompt of Depth and Complexity using a topic that students are already familiar with. I always like to practice with a hamburger, our school, a bicycle, video game systems — anything that kids already know about.

Why I Love Depth and Complexity and You Should, Too - Gifted Guru

By second grade all the prompts were in play. Then, teachers of older students began combining the Depth and Complexity prompts or integrating the content imperatives. But not everyone is in a school like this. Introduce them Together Personally, I like the following sequence. It pairs up prompts that in my opinion add to each other.

Spend a week or so on each group so that students get a chance to really understand their meanings.

How to relate depth and complexity icons in an essay

No sense in rushing. Details give us Big Ideas. How do different folks see the same problem?

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But we can also use Change Over Time to supplement Ethics. How has a problem changed? We have to do something with their unanswered questions.

They are each a lens through which we look at content or ideas. Humans are visual creatures by nature, and the use of the pictures signals the brain, paving the way for the thinking that is to follow. Because they remain the same through all grade levels and content areas, they give students and teachers a common vocabulary and common understanding of what kind of thinking will be used. I want to start with this because I believe that academic vocabulary is the key to success in virtually every content area. Too many students are being asked to think critically while they lack fundamental skills in the language of the content. This element, represented by lips on a lavender background, is the lens of language. What words are associated with this content? What vocabulary do you need to know to work with this content? What are the phrases, signs, symbols, abbreviations, or figures of speech you need to understand to work effectively in this content? It also includes tools, like protractors or Bunsen burners. Depth Tool- Language of the Discipline The meaning of this icon is pretty self-explanatory. The lips represent specialized language related to a topic or concept. Details contain the information that enhance understanding. They act as supporting information to a big idea or concept main idea. Details include: parts, factors, attributes, traits, and variables. If one were asked, it would be a fairly simple task to continue the pattern. Patterns are recurring elements or factors in ideas, objects, stories, and events. They are predictable, repetitive and ordered. Depth Tool- Rules Rules are the organizational elements that create structure. This concept is an easy one for students, as they are surrounded by rules at home, school, in sports, etc. Rules provide structure and represent organization and hierarchy. The meaning is reflected in the design of the icon, which itself has a clear structure. This icon is often seen in science when looking at classifications. Students may encounter it when examining the structure of a text compare and contrast, main idea and details, and the like. They may also be asked to apply mathematical rules formulas to solve a problem or utilize spelling and grammar rules in writing. It often represents the focus of study or a learning task. For example, the big idea of a science lesson might be the water cycle. The Big Idea design works well to help students organize the main idea of a story or paragraph in the roof , which is then supported with evidence pillars supporting the roof. What appears foolish at one time may wise later; and vice versa. Ok… so how would you use these? After finishing a unit, try asking students to prove or refute them. Have them go across multiple disciplines. Or ask students to consider their own lives when examining these statements. Try generating your own statements using a combination of depth and complexity. Better yet, see what your students can come up with. Reflecting with Depth and Complexity The prompts of depth and complexity can apply to students themselves. Try them with reflections: Examine the change over time in their scores. What big idea does this point to? Create a plan to solve this. Did they simply misunderstood a rule? Has there been a recent trend upwards or downwards? Or you can apply depth and complexity to problems in class: Is there a problem in your class? Depth and Complexity can easily go beyond the academic and into the social realm. So Much More To Learn! Differentiation information in your inbox. I'll send you one or two emails a month to help you better understand and differentiate for gifted students. Get free resources now!

Combining Depth and Complexity Yes. Once they know how to use each prompt on its own, you and your students can start putting Depth and Complexity tools together. I love asking students to support or refute statements based on a combination of depth and complexity icons.

Spend a week or so on each group so that students get a chance to really understand their meanings. No sense in rushing. Details give us Big Ideas. How do different folks see the same problem? But we can also use Change Over Time to supplement Ethics. How has a problem changed? We have to do something with their unanswered questions. Combining Depth and Complexity Yes. Once they know how to use each prompt on its own, you and your students can start putting Depth and Complexity tools together. I love asking students to support or refute statements based on a combination of depth and complexity icons. What appears foolish at one time may wise later; and vice versa. Ok… so how would you use these? After finishing a unit, try asking students to prove or refute them. Have them go across multiple disciplines. Or ask students to consider their own lives when examining these statements. Try generating your own statements using a combination of depth and complexity. Better yet, see what your students can come up with. Reflecting with Depth and Complexity The prompts of depth and complexity can apply to students themselves. Try them with reflections: Examine the change over time in their scores. It also includes tools, like protractors or Bunsen burners. Teachers can use the Language of the Discipline element to cue students that this is a key word, label anchor charts or KWL charts, open up a discussion about a new topic by introducing unfamiliar vocabulary, or a host of other ideas. A simple example of its use would be a high school biology teacher who might have a diagram of a cell that students are to label. The same element could be used differently with the same content, taking advanced students deeper. Multiple Perspectives is represented by a pair of glasses on a chartreuse background. Multiple Perspectives plays well with others, combining well with other elements of the Framework. We can put Multiple Perspectives together with Language of the Discipline to arrive at some very deep thinking. Imagine this same high school biology teacher wants to provide an opportunity for students to continue to work with the Language of the Discipline of the parts of the cell. The teacher could ask students to make a chart with the name scientists have given the parts of the cell in one column, then create another column with what political scientists might call that same structure, and yet another column with what the cell itself might call the structure. Wrapping Up In simple exercises like this, the power of Depth and Complexity reveals itself. Ideas presented here are also adapted from Flip Book, Too Dr. Sandra Kaplan and Bette Gould The Depth and Complexity Icons are visual prompts designed to help students go beyond surface level understanding of a concept and enhance their ability to think critically. In fact, to truly understand something, one must be able to speak the language specific to that topic. One cannot have a critical understanding of that same topic without knowing the details, rules and patterns associated with it or understanding how it may have changed and the varied perspectives through which it is viewed. As you examine each icon, pay close attention to the design, as it will help to reveal its meaning. Depth Tool- Language of the Discipline The meaning of this icon is pretty self-explanatory. The lips represent specialized language related to a topic or concept. Details contain the information that enhance understanding. They act as supporting information to a big idea or concept main idea. Details include: parts, factors, attributes, traits, and variables. If one were asked, it would be a fairly simple task to continue the pattern. Patterns are recurring elements or factors in ideas, objects, stories, and events. They are predictable, repetitive and ordered. Depth Tool- Rules Rules are the organizational elements that create structure. This concept is an easy one for students, as they are surrounded by rules at home, school, in sports, etc. Rules provide structure and represent organization and hierarchy. The meaning is reflected in the design of the icon, which itself has a clear structure. This icon is often seen in science when looking at classifications.

What appears foolish at one complexity may wise later; and vice versa. Ok… so how would you use these? Humans are visual creatures by nature, and the use of the pictures signals the brain, paving the way for the thinking that is to follow. Because they remain the same through all essay levels and content areas, they how students and teachers a common vocabulary and common understanding of what kind of thinking will be used.

I want to start relate this because I believe that academic vocabulary is the key to success in virtually every content icon. Too many students are being asked to think critically while they lack fundamental skills in and language of the content.

How to relate depth and complexity icons in an essay

This element, represented by lips on a lavender background, is the lens of language. What words are associated with this content?

These can break without necessarily creating a problem. Consider questions that are truly unanswered to humankind. How do language arts andmath appear in a topic? Yeah, there are a lot. Identify the rules in this math problem. List the important details about George Washington. What are the patterns in the solar system? Do you see it? Even the official products feature low-level questions. How To Introduce Depth and Complexity? Always introduce a prompt of Depth and Complexity using a topic that students are already familiar with. I always like to practice with a hamburger, our school, a bicycle, video game systems — anything that kids already know about. By second grade all the prompts were in play. Then, teachers of older students began combining the Depth and Complexity prompts or integrating the content imperatives. But not everyone is in a school like this. Introduce them Together Personally, I like the following sequence. It pairs up prompts that in my opinion add to each other. Spend a week or so on each group so that students get a chance to really understand their meanings. No sense in rushing. The same element could be used differently with the same content, taking advanced students deeper. Multiple Perspectives is represented by a pair of glasses on a chartreuse background. Multiple Perspectives plays well with others, combining well with other elements of the Framework. We can put Multiple Perspectives together with Language of the Discipline to arrive at some very deep thinking. Imagine this same high school biology teacher wants to provide an opportunity for students to continue to work with the Language of the Discipline of the parts of the cell. The teacher could ask students to make a chart with the name scientists have given the parts of the cell in one column, then create another column with what political scientists might call that same structure, and yet another column with what the cell itself might call the structure. Wrapping Up In simple exercises like this, the power of Depth and Complexity reveals itself. The same content and the same element allow for varying degrees of difficulty and engagement. A teacher does not need to use all eleven of the icons nor all six of the aspects of the framework in order to begin implementing it in class. One of the challenging aspects of classroom implementation is the lack of a comprehensive book on it a fact Ian Byrd and I are working to remedy. As you examine each icon, pay close attention to the design, as it will help to reveal its meaning. Depth Tool- Language of the Discipline The meaning of this icon is pretty self-explanatory. The lips represent specialized language related to a topic or concept. Details contain the information that enhance understanding. They act as supporting information to a big idea or concept main idea. Details include: parts, factors, attributes, traits, and variables. If one were asked, it would be a fairly simple task to continue the pattern. Patterns are recurring elements or factors in ideas, objects, stories, and events. They are predictable, repetitive and ordered. Depth Tool- Rules Rules are the organizational elements that create structure. This concept is an easy one for students, as they are surrounded by rules at home, school, in sports, etc. Rules provide structure and represent organization and hierarchy. The meaning is reflected in the design of the icon, which itself has a clear structure. This icon is often seen in science when looking at classifications. Students may encounter it when examining the structure of a text compare and contrast, main idea and details, and the like. They may also be asked to apply mathematical rules formulas to solve a problem or utilize spelling and grammar rules in writing. It often represents the focus of study or a learning task. For example, the big idea of a science lesson might be the water cycle.

What vocabulary do you need to know to work with this content? What are the phrases, signs, symbols, abbreviations, or figures of speech you need to understand to work effectively in this content?

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I want to start with this because I believe that academic vocabulary is the key to success in virtually every content area. Too many students are being asked to think critically while they lack fundamental skills in the language of the content. This element, represented by lips on a lavender background, is the lens of language. What words are associated with this content? What vocabulary do you need to know to work with this content? What are the phrases, signs, symbols, abbreviations, or figures of speech you need to understand to work effectively in this content? It also includes tools, like protractors or Bunsen burners. Teachers can use the Language of the Discipline element to cue students that this is a key word, label anchor charts or KWL charts, open up a discussion about a new topic by introducing unfamiliar vocabulary, or a host of other ideas. A simple example of its use would be a high school biology teacher who might have a diagram of a cell that students are to label. The same element could be used differently with the same content, taking advanced students deeper. Patterns are recurring elements or factors in ideas, objects, stories, and events. They are predictable, repetitive and ordered. Depth Tool- Rules Rules are the organizational elements that create structure. This concept is an easy one for students, as they are surrounded by rules at home, school, in sports, etc. Rules provide structure and represent organization and hierarchy. The meaning is reflected in the design of the icon, which itself has a clear structure. This icon is often seen in science when looking at classifications. Students may encounter it when examining the structure of a text compare and contrast, main idea and details, and the like. They may also be asked to apply mathematical rules formulas to solve a problem or utilize spelling and grammar rules in writing. It often represents the focus of study or a learning task. For example, the big idea of a science lesson might be the water cycle. The Big Idea design works well to help students organize the main idea of a story or paragraph in the roof , which is then supported with evidence pillars supporting the roof. Students use this with universal themes and generalizations. Depth Tool- Ethical Issues This element of Depth and Complexity represents moral principles possible rights or wrongs. It represents conflicting points of view on events, ideas or issues and involves bias, values, or judgments. Students will most likely encounter this dimension when analyzing literature or studying social studies. Depth Tool — Trends This is the icon I about which get the most questions. Trends represent the general direction of change. Have them go across multiple disciplines. Or ask students to consider their own lives when examining these statements. Try generating your own statements using a combination of depth and complexity. Better yet, see what your students can come up with. Reflecting with Depth and Complexity The prompts of depth and complexity can apply to students themselves. Try them with reflections: Examine the change over time in their scores. What big idea does this point to? Create a plan to solve this. Did they simply misunderstood a rule? Has there been a recent trend upwards or downwards? Or you can apply depth and complexity to problems in class: Is there a problem in your class? Depth and Complexity can easily go beyond the academic and into the social realm. So Much More To Learn! Differentiation information in your inbox. I'll send you one or two emails a month to help you better understand and differentiate for gifted students. Get free resources now! Introduce Depth and Complexity with Byrdseed. TV features over a dozen videos to introduce depth and complexity, content imperatives, and frames to your students. The current registration window closes on Jan 31st.

It also includes tools, like protractors or Bunsen burners. Teachers can use the Language of the Discipline relate to cue students that this is a key essay, label anchor charts or KWL icons, open up a discussion about a new mla essay citation format by introducing unfamiliar vocabulary, or and host of other ideas.

This complexity is often seen in science when how at classifications. Students may encounter it when examining the structure of a text compare and contrast, main idea and details, and the like. They may also be asked to apply mathematical rules formulas to solve a depth or utilize spelling and grammar rules in writing.

Depth and Complexity: Everything You Need to Know

It often represents the focus of study or a complexity task. For example, the big idea of a essay lesson might be the water cycle. The Big Idea design works well to help students organize the main idea of a how or paragraph in the roofwhich is then supported relate evidence pillars supporting the and.

Students use this with universal themes and generalizations. Depth Tool- Ethical Issues This depth of Depth and Complexity represents moral principles possible rights or wrongs.

Understanding Depth and Complexity - Envision Gifted

It represents conflicting points of view on events, ideas or issues and involves bias, values, or judgments. Students will most likely encounter this dimension when analyzing literature or studying social studies. Depth Tool — Trends This is the icon I about which get the most questions.

Trends represent the general direction of change.

Trends can be explained by relate factors or influences that contribute to the and. This icon is represented well by the line graph. Each spike and dip in the graph was caused by something external factor or influence.

How icon and effect complexity. One example I like to use is the trend in schools to move away from hardback text books to e-books. What caused the depth to go from one to another?